Tick, mosquito-borne infections surge in United States: CDC


us
 Tick, mosquito-borne infections surge in United States: CDC

FILE PHOTO - San Diego County officials hand spray a two block area to help prevent the mosquito-borne transmission of the Zika virus in San Diego, CaliforniaThe number of Americans sickened each year by bites from infected mosquitoes, ticks or fleas tripled from 2004 through 2016, with infection rates spiking sharply in 2016 as a result of a Zika outbreak, U.S. health officials said on Tuesday.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that some 96,075 diseases caused by bites by mosquitoes, ticks and fleas were reported in 2016, up from 27,388 in 2004, in an analysis of data from the CDC's National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System.

Infections in 2016 went up 73 percent from 2015, reflecting the emergence of Zika, which is transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause severe birth defects. Zika was the most common disease borne by ticks, mosquitoes and fleas reported in 2016, with 41,680 cases reported, followed by Lyme disease, with 36,429 cases, almost double the number in 2004.

The increases may be a result of climate change, with increased temperatures and shorter winters boosting populations of ticks, mosquitoes and other disease-carrying creatures known as "vectors."

"It enables these ticks to expand to new areas. Where there are ticks, there comes diseases," said Lyle Petersen, director of the CDC's Division of Vector-Borne Diseases.

Warmer summer temperatures also tend to bring outbreaks of mosquito-borne illnesses, Petersen said.

While Zika stood out as the latest emerging threat in the report, it also showed a long-term increase in cases of tick-borne Lyme disease, which can attack the heart and nervous system if left untreated.

Researchers warned that their numbers likely do not include every case as many infections are not reported.

These increases are due to many factors, including growing populations of the insects that transmit them and increased exposure outside of the United States by travelers who unknowingly transport diseases back home.

The CDC said more than 80 percent of vector-control organizations across the United States lack the capacity to prevent and control these fast-spreading, demanding illnesses. Petersen said that federal programs are increasing funding for those organizations.

(Reporting by Gina Cherelus; editing by Scott Malone and Grant McCool)

By: Reuters

« us

  CITIES NEWS
LONDON
DUBAI
BEDMINSTER, New Jersey
SEOUL
TAIPEI
MOSCOW
BERLIN
STOCKHOLM
WASHINGTON
LOS ANGELES
BRASILIA
SILVERSTONE, England
SAYLORSBURG, Pa
AMSTERDAM
BERGERAC, France
KABUL
BARCELONA
PARIS
MOSUL, Iraq
BRUSSELS
DOHA
CAIRO
FRANKFURT
LAUSANNE
  DATE NEWS
2018/08/20
Manafort, defense team 'very happy' after jury fails to reach verdict in third day of deliberations


2018/08/19
8 experts on why the Paul Manafort jury doesnt have a verdict yet — and what it might mean


2018/08/18
After detente with North Korea, Trump increasingly takes aim at a new foe — China


2018/08/17
GOP fundraiser Broidy under investigation for alleged effort to sell government influence, people familiar with probe say


2018/08/16
Commander who oversaw bin Laden raid: It'd be 'an honor' for Trump to revoke my clearance


2018/08/15
US newsrooms to Trump: We're not enemies of the people